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HomeAcademic staffMr Jon Alldis
Mr Jon Alldis

Mr Jon Alldis

alldisj@lsbu.ac.uk

Adult Nursing

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I am a Senior Lecturer in Adult Nursing, and a Registered Adult Nurse. I joined LSBU in 2019, having worked previously in the NHS and at University College London (UCL). I teach a range of topics to Adult Nursing students and Nursing Associate students.

My main teaching areas relate to public health, global health, sexual health, infectious diseases, social determinants of health, health inequalities, LGBTQ+ health and wellbeing, and evidence-based practice. These areas are vital within nurse and nursing associate education, as nurses lead the way in promoting health and preventing ill health.

In addition to my teaching roles, I am the Course Director for the 'Registered Nurse Degree Apprenticeship - BSc (Hons) Adult Nursing' course which started in 2021, and I am the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Lead for the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Courses taught

Adult Nursing - BSc (Hons)

Adult Nursing - PgDip/MSc

FdSc Nursing Associate (NMC 2018) (Apprenticeship)

Master of Nursing Science (MNursSci)

The University of Nottingham

2003
2007
Master of Public Health (MPH)

The University of Nottingham

2009
2010
Master of Science in Reproductive and Sexual Health Research (MSc)

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

2014
2016
Postgraduate Certificate in Practice Education (PGCert)

London South Bank University

2020
2021
Registered Adult Nurse

Nursing and Midwifery Council

2007

Filter publications

Ethnic inequalities in mental health and socioeconomic status among older women living with HIV: results from the PRIME Study.
Solomon, D., Tariq, S., Alldis, J., Burns, F., Gilson, R., Sabin, C., Sherr, L., Pettit, F. and Dhairyawan, R. (2021). Ethnic inequalities in mental health and socioeconomic status among older women living with HIV: results from the PRIME Study. Sexually transmitted infections. pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2020-054788